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ChildrensBooks2U Blog

  1. Oh, What A Feeling!
    Teaching children to understand and name their feelings will help them to cope better and also improves their overall behavior. Check out some tips separated by age on how to sneak some emotional learning into your child's life.

    Ages 0-4 Read Together.
    From the very beginning you can use kids books to help children recognize their different emotions. Start by pointing out sad faces. As your child gets a little older, you can ask them questions about characters. Why do you think Jenna is angry? How could she feel better.

    Ages 4-6 Pretend With Purpose.
    During your child's play time, put your kids action figures or dolls in situations that will challenge them emotionally. For instance, maybe Pirate Jack is upset because his mom told him he could not go on an exciting adventure. Then you can act out the scenerio. Next, you need to brainstorm together what the character should do when he feels this certain way.

    Ages 6 and Up Share When I Was A Kid Stories.
    Confess about the day you broke your baseball bat out of anger and then regretted it. Or the time you felt left out when you were not invited to a friends birthday party. When you share your own challenges and how you managed them, you teach your kids how to come up with their own coping strategies.

    Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  2. Sometimes the problem is not your child's willingness to listen to you, but how much they are enjoying what they are already doing. It is important to establish routines so they know what is coming up next. If they always take a bath before storytime, remind your child that they can only spend 15 minutes in the tub if they want to read their favorite book. Try using warnings like, "Hey, we need to get out and dry off in 5 minutes." You can even give them a second alert about 2 minutes before they should start picking up their bath toys. When the time comes to stop playing, it will not seem as abrupt and they will be in the right mind set to cooperate. Check out one of our more recent posts on Monitoring Yourself. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

  3. If your child still seems to resist your instructions, it is worthwhile to take a step back and evaluate how you deliver them. The best way to get anyone to listen to you is to speak with a respectful tone of voice. If you catch yourself standing with your hands on your hips and barking commands at your child, switch to a more neutral tone and a less confrontational posture. Your preschooler will be more likely to respond. Instead of saying, "No running in the house!" try, "Walk, please." You will be more successful with a positive approach. Check out one of our more recent posts, Make Sense For Your Child. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child. A quick reminder that all Halloween children's books are on sale.

  4. It may seem to you that your child never gets tired of asking, "Why?" even though you may feel a bit tired of answering these questions. But sometimes a thoughtful explanation is just what your child is needing in order to accept and follow directions. If they do not want to buckle their seat belt, for example, spell out why it is important to wear it. Tell them that the reason you need them to wear it is to keep them safe and it is the law. Learning the logic behind your request will help them appreciate that it does serve a distinct purpose (like safety!). Check out another one of our posts, Show Them The Way. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

  5. Do not be surprised if you say, "Time to wash your hands." and your preschooler plops in front of the television or just outright refuses. Try to lead by example. Have him pull up a stool to the sink while you stand beside him and wash your hands too. It is more fun when ge does not have to do it all alone. You are setting an example of how to stick to a routine (always washing up before eating a meal) and stay on task. Eventually this will become a habit and you may not have to remind him to do it at all. See more on offering assistance. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  6. If your little preschooler does not follow your directions, they are not trying to be defiant: they probably just need a little assistance. Your child may desperately want to follow your instructions and do it all on their own. But they just do not have all the necessary skills yet. So instead of failing at the task, they just will not do it at all. If you ask them to put on their shoes, but they wander off, do not assume that they are ignoring you. Get down to their level, make eye contact, and ask what they are having trouble with. Eight times out of ten, they will be able to tell you. Maybe they have not learned how to fasten their sneakers. Take a bit of time to show them how to loosen the straps to put them on and then line up the Velcro so they stay secure when they stand up. To ease the pressure, practice when you are not about to leave the house. Next time, things will go much more smoothly. Check out one of our previous posts on listening up to your children. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  7. Tweaking your approach will help your child pay attention.
    When my son was 5, I had asked him to get on his coat because we were going to go to the store. He looked at me with his big eyes and nodded in understanding. Five minutes later, with keys in my hand, but no David in sight. I had finally found him sitting with his 3-year-old brother, behind the couch, decorating the wall behind him with a can of cooking spray. Ugh!
    Although, 3 and 4-year olds are physically able to do a lot of things (like snag the cooking spray off the kitchen counter), their focus and attention span are not fully developed. Preschoolers are still little kids, and they need your patience as they try to tackle new challenges like following directions. Fortunately, there are several ways you can maximize your child's ability to listen and minimize your frustrations. In our upcoming posts we will give you some very useful tips into navigating this trying time. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.
  8. Every parent wants their child to find a game that is perfect for their personality. How to make that decision? Observe the way they play and move and steer them accordingly.
    • If your kid gets along well with other children, loves running around, and lets off steam by kicking whatever they can: Try soccer.
    • If your child dances around the living room, has good balance, and displays upper-body strength on the jungle gym: Try gymnastics.
    • If your kid likes playing catch and using their toys as projectiles: Try baseball or softball.
    • If your child loves taking baths and does not panic when water gets in their eyes: Try swimming.
    • If your kid is always hopping and skipping around and possesses good hand-eye coordination (they can pour their own juice without spilling, for instance): Try tennis.
    • If your child is always up for bouncing a ball in the driveway, can toss their laundry into the hamper from several feet away, and is happy to be part of a team: Try basketball.
    • If your kid slides across the clean kitchen floor without slipping and could play all day outside in the cold weather: Try hockey.
    • If your child jumps on you when you walk through the door, likes to roughhouse with other kids, and does not mind wearing a helmet: Try football.
    Check out our previous post on when athletic skills develop. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

    Picking The Right Sport

  9. While every kid is different, physical milestones tend to follow this basic timeline.
    Baby
    • 3 months Raises head and chest and kicks legs
    • 7 months Sits up
    • 12 months Crawls, pulls themselves up, and cruises
    Toddler
    • 12 to 15 months Walks
    • 20 months Runs
    • 2 years Tracks the path of a moving ball
    • 2 to 3 years Kicks and catches a small rolled ball
    Preschooler
    • Catches a large ball with 2 hands and body
    • Pumps a swing
    • Kicks a soccer ball
    • Hits off a tee with a large plastic bat
    Early Grade Schooler
    • Swings from monkey bars
    • Rides a two-wheeler
    • Swims with basic strokes
    • Jumps rope
    • Plays hopscotch
    • Dribbles and shoots at a low basket
    If you would like to visit our posts by age, then check out our ChildrensBooks2U blog page. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.
  10. By the first grade, most children can skip, gallop, jump, throw, and catch. Their athletic abilities are starting to emerge. While it is fine to let your child choose their favorite sport, you should also encourage them to try a variety of activities at this age. If he idolizes a superstar like LeBron James or Tom Brady, remind him that professional athletes do training beyond their main sport. Focus on fun more than performance. Whether it is joining a flag football league or just catching pop-ups in the school yard.
    Practice jumping. Teach your child to jump rope the easy way. Have him begin with it behind his body and then flip it over his head without jumping. Once he can do that, see whether he can hop over the rope and flip it around again. Keep on going until he can jump a few times in a row without missing.
    Do some drills. Set up a soccer ball about 10 feet from a net (or you can just use 2 nearby trees) and have your child try to score some goals. Each time he is successful, have him take a few steps back. Or if you are playing catch, start close to each other and move back until they have reached their limits of their throwing range.
    Sign up for a team. Check out some local recreational leagues if your child seems ready for competition. Keep in mind that there is a lot of variation in size and ability at this age and it is a coach's job to make all of the players feel important. The emphasis should be on letting every child have fun and participate, and not whether the team wins or loses. If your child spends most of their time warming the bench, then the program is probably too competitive for him.
    Encourage individuality. If your child is not a natural team player or recoils from competition, find out what types of exercise make them happy. Whether it is playing hopscotch, dancing to her favorite song, or even playing Wii U sports games and use them to help her stay active. The bottom line is that you want your child to keep moving and have fun doing it. The rest will come.
    Did you miss our post on Preschoolers? You can check it out here. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  11. By the age of 3, children usually have more confidence in their movements and strong opinions about what activities they like to do. Introduce your child to different sports, and bring along a friend (a preschooler is more likely to be active when they have good company).

    Create an obstacle course. When you are hosting a playdate, clear some space in your basement or backyard, and stack objects to jump over or crawl under or through. Add some stuffed animals or toys to run around and a few Hula-Hoops to walk through. Time how long it takes your child and their friend to finish, and challenge them to break the course record.

    Play balloon ball. Blow up a balloon halfway and see whether your child can smack in with a junior racket (or they can just use their hand). They are probably not ready to hit a little fuzzy ball, but this exercise will improve their hand-eye coordination.

    Set up target practice. Place a large basket or an empty trash can on the floor and have your child stand a few feet away from it. See whether they can toss a Nerfball or a crumpled up piece of paper into it. As their accuracy improves, have them take 2 steps back and try again.

    Get a jump rope. Your child can not jump by themselves yet, so think of some other fun games to play together. Make a circle with the rope and it will become an imaginary puddle of water to leap over. Turn it into a straight line and have them jump over it from side to side like a skier tackling moguls. or see whether they can walk across it like a tightrope to test their balance.

    Try a class. Noncompetitive programs in dance, gymnastics, and soccer provide structure and build basic skills. The one class that all kids should at least try is swimming. It is never to early to get a child comfortable in the water. And by age 4 they may be able to float and start swimming on their own.

    Let them run. Preschoolers love to have people chase them and try to get away. These are great skills to develop for sports like baseball and soccer. Play tag, have your child run away from "Daddy Dinosaur" or "Mommy Monster", or round up a group of their friends for some relay races.

    Check out our post on toddlers if your child is not quite ready for some of these activities. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  12. Once your child become mobile, they will start to run, jump, throw, catch, kick, and grasp. But they may get a bit frustrated or become bored within a few minutes. That is why you should focus on short activities that will help improve their agility.

    Blow bubbles. What a toddler does not love chasing them down? And it is not just fun. I'll let you in on a little secret, I still love doing this. When they try to catch or pop bubbles, they are practicing their hand-eye coordination as well as their running and jumping skills.

    Throw a colorful scarf in the air. As your child watches it float down toward the ground, they will be developing the ability to track an object's movements. This is a skill that will come in handy in playing many sports, from soccer to baseball to tennis.

    Having a ball. Kids at this age are fascinated by the way balls move, so keep a variety handy (such as a beach ball, kickball, and a small rubber ball). By playing with them, your child will get a sense of how they roll and bounce.

    Let them walk on your bed. Stepping across an unstable surface, like a mattress, is a great way to improve balance. So is also having them mimic a tripod by placing both hands on the floor and lifting one leg up.

    Act like an animal. Take turns pretending to be different creatures, and imitate how each one gets around. Try crawling like a kitty, swinging your arms like a chimp, and hopping like a bunny.
    Not ready for the toddlers stage just yet, check out our post on babies.

    Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

    Play tunnels keep kids moving and help boost their agility.

  13. Your child's first year is all about learning new moves, from turning their head to turning your home upside down once they learn how to creep, crawl, and soon walk. A baby makes tremendous advances in their physical skills and movements and these will be the foundation of their athleticism as they get older.

    Making a connection. Help your baby to learn to interact with the world. Ring a bell so he will turn his head toward you. And when he is starting to roll over, try talking of singing to give him an incentive to turn toward you.

    Let her be free. Most babies spend a lot of time in a stroller, swing, play yard, or even a car seat. Your child needs a chance to let loose in order to master new movements, such as rolling over and pulling themselves up. Place your infant face up in a baby activity gym every day so she can reach for low hanging objects. And do not overlook tummy time opportunities. Babies need to get used to being on their belly even if they do not like it in order to develop crawling skills. During your babies first few months 10-minute sessions on her tummy every day, though it is fine if they end up being shorter at first.

    Build his balance. Once your baby can sit up, gently move him from side to side or lift him up and down to boost his sense of stability.

    Try games. Hold up a soft pillow and let your baby kick against it, or put a bright toy just out of reach to coax her to crawl.
    See our post on raising a sporty kid. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  14. You do not need to be a jock to have an athlete in the family. If you start early and keep it playful, your child will stay active for life.

    From the moment she could lift herself up, my daughter, Jenna has loved to climb things. She is as happy hanging upside down from the monkey bars as she is swinging on a doorknob. Her little brother, David, is much more contemplative. He takes the time to line up the ball before he kicks it and carefully studies the fastest way to get down a playground slide. But they do share one key thing in common: They both love to be moving. I am not trying to raise a professional athlete or an Olympic gold medalist, but in light of our nation's scary childhood obesity crisis, the rate has more than doubled among children ages 2-5 and tripled for 6-11 year-olds since 1980. I want to instill in my kids a lasting love of being physical. The benefits of promoting athletic skills such as running, jumping, climbing, throwing, and catching go well beyond helping kids maintain a healthy weight. Performing athletics help a child's muscles and bones develop properly and stimulate their brains. Kids who are physically fit get higher test scores. It is also suggested that children who play a sport tend to have greater self-confidence. They are more likely to stay in school and have less behavioral problems. Regardless of your child's natural talent on the field or the court, the best thing you can do is introduce them to as many physical activities as possible. One kid may enjoy playing tag while another prefers running after a ball. You never know what is going to make them happy. We will guide you with our age by age breakdown that will get your kid ready for the field, diamond, court, pool, or track. Anywhere but the sidelines. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.



    Kids love working their way through an obstacle course.
  15. Innocent crushes can start as early as kindergarten. Here is how to help your little one navigate the love bug.

    Avoid teasing. Though you do not mean any harm, teasing can embarrass your child and make them less likely to open up about new feeling in the future. Instead, ask open ended questions, like "What do you like about her?"

    Host a playdate. Often times, a crush just means that a child wants to be friends. It is OK to invite peers of the opposite sex over without it being anything more. Try a gender neutral activity such as a bike ride or a trip to the local park.

    Check in at school. Most kids with crushes are too shy to act on their feelings, but some enthusiastic admirers offer hugs and kisses. Speak to the teacher if you think your child may be giving or receiving unwanted affection. Most children simply outgrow this phase.

    Find the teachable moment. Use a crush to talk about friendship, including showing respect. Remind her to treat everyone with kindness, even if she does not share the same feelings.

    Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  16. If your child packs their own lunch for school or cleans up their room, resist the urge to criticize that it was not done right. Or even worse making them redo the task. This will diminish their enthusiasm for taking the initiative in the future. But if it is something more important, you will need to gently intervene. I remember a time a few years back when I let my then 9-year-old son, Joseph, pack his own overnight bag for a family camping trip near our home. When we stopped for lunch, Joe had realized that he forgot to bring a hat and a pair of gloves. He was worried that I was going to be upset with him, but I did not say anything. After a little while, I pulled a hat and pair of gloves from my bag. The next time we went out camping he remembered everything. By the same token, rather than always swooping in when your child has a dilemma. "Dad this needs new batteries or I do not understand this science question", help them to brainstorm how to slove it on their own. When you handle every problem for your child, it sends the message that you do not have the confidence in their skills. See another post on Getting Your Child To Follow Instructions. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

  17. When you give your child a new task, it is best to show them how it is done rather than simply telling them what to do. It is not enough to just say, "Get your backpack ready for school every night and put it by the front door." You need to demonstrate to them exactly what you want them to do, because kids this age still have trouble putting events in order. For example, you might say, "Watch how I put the homework in your folder and then put all the books and folder back into the backpack. Then I zip it up and take it to the front door." That is what worked with my sons, David, 7, and Joe, 9. I explain to them step by step what tasks I want them to do, whether it is washing the dishes or folding their laundry. I have found that giving them precise, simple instructions works the best. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child. If you would like to see one of our previous posts on Creating a To Do List, follow the link.



  18. Some parents may unwittingly hold their kids back just out of habit. If you have always flossed your child's teeth, it might not even occur to you to let them try to do it for themselves. Or even perhaps you have been making your child's bed for so long that it has become second nature. To get some perspective, write down the tasks that you do for your child and star a couple that you would feel comfortable handing off. Now 8, Joe has started learning how to wash his clothes and he makes his own snacks after school. Instead of saying, "I am hungry Mom," he makes a peanut-butter sandwich or drizzles some honey on some apple slices. Sometimes he even asks me if I would want anything. Check out our first post on being self-sufficient. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  19. With a little encouragement, your child can handle more responsibility.

    Although my son Joseph was 7, I was still laying out his pajamas for him at bedtime, getting him a drink, and hanging a towel on the shower door so he did not have to grab one from the closet. I found myself making excuses that Joe was tired from school and all his activities, so we would do things for him. There was one day when I was behind on laundry and asked Joe for some help. He very proudly folded three loads better that I did. I had realized that if Joe was doing this task so well, he had the capability of handling others as well. You will be pretty surprised how easy it is to help your own kid become more indepentent. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  20. Most anxious children have a combination of the following conditions.
    • Generalized anxiety disorder: An excessive worry about things that are out of a child's control and a tendency to always imagine the worst case scenario or worry about adult issues, like money.
    • Social anxiety: A child's fear of meeting or talking to people, along with a worry that they will be teased or humiliated and that everyone is judging their every move.
    • Selective mutism: A condition where a child who talks easily with family and friends gets anxious in front of teachers, other authority figures, and even peers that he freezes up and can't speak at all.
    • Separation anxiety: A constant, debilitating fear of being separated from one's parents or that harm will come to them, at a level that is inappropriate for a child's age.
    • Obsessive-compulsive disorder: A need for ritual or compulsive behavior, like washing or counting, to relieve anxiety about a fear or intrusive thoughts about upsetting topics.
    • Phobia: An illogical, all-consuming fear (such as fear of dogs, vomit, elevators, or bugs).
    Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  21. Bedtime help at home
    At their bedtime, create a soothing ritual. Instead of allowing video games or other types of screens, have your child read a book that will calm them or do some relaxing exercises. Some basic yoga is great for relaxing the body. You can also try this exercise called The Four Doors. Before your child goes to bed, have them imagine four doors. Behind each door is something fun, like a party, a favorite cartoon character, a family vacation, or even a chocolate factory. Your child can choose whichever of the four doors to enter and think about what is inside, which can help them feel more in charge of their own bedtime routine. You need to also consider how your own anxiety might be affecting your child. Screaming at the sight of a bug in your room, for instance, will teach them to be afraid of bugs too. So if you have been waiting for a good reason to seek some help for your own anxious behavior, this may be a perfect time. Whether your child gets help for their anxiety through therapy, medication, or by using strategies at home, the change in their behavior can be remarkable. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  22. Helping your child out at home
    If your child does seem a bit anxious but it is not interfering with their normal everyday life, there are plenty of ways you can help them manage their worries without professional assistance. First, ask yourself how much you have accommodated their fears. All parents instinctively want to protect and comfort their children. If your child screams hysterically whenever a dog walks by, you would naturally try to keep them away from dogs. Doing that may make things a bit easier in the short term, but it reinforces their fears. Instead, they need to confront their fears and work on their skills of managing it. You can help your child take small steps, like watching dogs from a distance and then petting a puppy on a leash. With each little victory, celebrate your child's bravery. For some children, a small reward, like fifteen extra minutes on the Xbox, might help them face their fear. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  23. Trying out some drug therapy
    Medication can often be recommended when a child is not making any progress with talk therapy by itself or is so severely impaired that they are not eating or sleeping. This makes many parents very uncomfortable, but doctors will urge them to look at the big picture. If a child has symptoms that will overwhelm their capacity to cope and their parents' ability to help them, then it is appropriate to at least consider every option that is available. In fact, certain medications can often be an essential part of a child's treatment.
    For children that have severe anxiety, there are two types of medication that have been found to be more effective than others. The most common are antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's), such as Prozac and Zoloft. These medications increase the levels of serotonin, which is a naturally occurring chemical in the brain that is known to regulate moods. The second group of medications is antianxiety drugs called benzodiazepines. They are used less frequently because they can cause some hyperactivity in young children and can become less effective over a period of time. Some of the common side effects for all of these medications include headaches, nausea, irritability or sedation. Most of these effects will go away within a couple of weeks, or the prescription or dosage can be adjusted. Talk more with your doctor if you see that your child's behavior or personality seems to be drastically and negatively different after starting the medication. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  24. Most anxious kids are quiet and well-behaved, so their problems can go unnoticed.
    If you are worried about
     your kid's anxiety, it is better to seek out services early rather than to wait it out. Ask your pediatrician or even a school counselor for a referral to a child psychologist or a local clinic, and schedule an evaluation. It is important to treat this meeting with the same matter-of-fact attitude as you would when taking your child to the doctor for a cough. Explain the visit to your child using the same words he uses to tell you about his problems. "We are going to talk to someone who can teach you how not to worry at school." For several kids, especially those in the early stages of an anxiety disorder, cognitive behavioral therapy alone can make them start to feel better within just a few weeks or months. While it will not eliminate anxiety from their life, children learn to recognize what they are feeling and manage those reactions. A child who has an obsessive fear of germs may be taught to notice when his heart beats faster at the sight of someone coughing and to take deep breaths to calm them down. They will also learn coping techniques, such as telling himself, "Millions of people touch things every day and do not get sick." Finally, he will be exposed little by little to his fear, going with the therapist to a public bathroom and touching the sink and then the toilet handle. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

  25. Look On The Bright Side
    Luckily, anxiety is one of the most treatable disorders in kids. With the use of talk therapy and medications, it is found that four-fifths of children can control their anxiety and live a very happy and productive life. However, anxious children often go undiagnosed. Many parents think that their child will simply grow out of this issue or that it is just normal for a child to be nervous. Though some kids with anxiety act out or even refuse to attend school, most children - like my daughter - are quiet and well-behaved. So it is quite easy for them to get lost in the shuffle. When I had first told friends that I was worried about her silence in school, they would say, "She is just shy." And seeing how often parents are accused of helicopter parenting, I did not want to overreact. I am glad that I did not listen to the doubters and instead followed what my gut was telling me. It is unlikely that a child will outgrow an anxiety disorder. When it is left untreated, they will have a higher risk of substance abuse later in life. Did you see our previous post on Anxiety? Check it out here. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  26. Family Connection
    There is a family connection too: Kids with an anxious parent are up to seven times more likely to have an anxiety disorder compared with kids whose parents are not anxious. The link is both biological and behavioral. There is an inherited risk, but when parents are overprotective or model their own fears, they increase their child's risk of anxiety. Difficult situations, like the death of a close relative, moving, or even the ongoing daily stress of having an unemployed parent or tough financial times can also push manageable anxiety into a full-blown disorder. A major event can at times make a child feel like everything in their life is changing and nothing is predictable.
    If your child's worries are keeping them from going to school, playing with friends, or even taking part in other fun activities that they would normally enjoy, or if they complain of headaches or stomachaches that do not have any medical origin, then they probably have a condition that will require treatment.
    Another cause for concern: questions and fears that seem out of proportion to the situation and continue for 6 months or get much worse over time. For instance, it is perfectly normal for a child to ask, "Can that happen to us?" after seeing a news report about a house fire; it is not normal to obsess about that fire several months later. Check out this post on Fears to get more information. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  27. Making Some Sense Out Of Their Fears

    My daughter has suffered from anxiety since she was in kindergarten. Although she talked seemingly nonstop at home, at school she would become so froze with fear that she did not say a single word during the first half of the year. She would constantly as us about tornadoes and floods, though neither was likely to happen where we live. She has the same DNA as her older brother and was raised in the same home, so why was one of my kids confident and calm while the other was wracked with worries?
    It is just the luck of the genetic draw. There is a sort of smoke detector in your head that is supposed to go off when the brain perceives danger, and it triggers the fight-or-flight response. In anxious kids, their smoke detector is set to a much more sensitive level, and they also have a much more dramatic reaction. In fact, it has been shown that the differences in stress response can be detected in babies as young as 6 weeks old, proving that nature is at least as important as nurture when it comes to anxiety.  Here you can check out our first post on Anxiety. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  28. In many cases, kids that have anxiety may stop eating, sleeping, or going to school. At the very least, their instability can set them apart from their peers, often at an age when fitting in is vital. "Jenna is so scared she will do something wrong, like knocking over a toy and making a huge noise, that she avoids playing with others." She has social and separation anxiety plus OCD symptoms brought on by an extreme fear of vomiting. Talking it out has helped her to express her fears, and we have been able to invite kids over so that she can practice socializing on her own turf, but it is a constant struggle for her.
    A child's anxiety can have a ripple effect on the entire family. We pick our vacations based on which location we hope will have the least noise, and we are both exhausted by the end of the day. Since not all kinds of therapy are not covered by insurance, dealing with an anxious kid can also add to a financial burden to an already stressed family. It can be difficult for a marriage too. IF the child tends to confide in only one parent, the other may be skeptical, wondering, "How can a kid be so anxious when nothing bad has ever happened to her?" That is a question that parents across the country, including myself, ask themselves every day.
    Have you read Part 1 of this post. Check it out! Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.




  29. For some children, minor worries turn into outright fears. But with the correct approach, you can assist your child in feeling reassured.

    In many ways, Joe is like a lot of other 7-year-old boys. He plays baseball and football, knows the names of every Star Wars character, and is obsessed with Minecraft. But after his father tucks him in at night, scary thoughts start to pop into his head and he can't let go of them. He worries so much about everything, like that someone might be outside his window or the house will catch on fire. Sometimes these thoughts keep him up all night. I will let him know that we are safe, and although he knows that it is true, he just can not settle it down in his little mind. Even at times during the day, anything that deviates from the normal schedule for Joe can lead to a huge unraveling. We were just a couple of minutes late for dropping him off at baseball practice, and when we arrived he was so worried that everyone was looking at him that he could not relax and join his teammates. All kids get stressed out at times. They will have some butterflies leading up to the first day of school or worry about being left out if their BFF plays with someone else at recess. Most kids will complain, maybe cry a bit, and then move on. But for the estimated one in five kids in the United States who suffer from anxiety disorders (including separation anxiety, social anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder), it is a major challenge to manage their worries. They ricochet through the child's head, getting more intense over time instead of naturally fading away. No matter how much you answer an anxious child's questions or tell them that things are fine, they can not absorb your reassurances. Check out some of our other great posts on our ChildrensBooks2U Blog Page.  Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  30. From time to time we here at ChildrensBooks2U like to give our readers a chance to share some of their stuff. Are you looking to get more exposure? Or maybe you just have a piece of work you have done that you are really proud of. Whatever the case may be we would like to give you the opportunity to share your work with us and our readers. So just drop what you would like to share in the comments. I can't wait to see all the exciting things that you share. Thank you and have a great day.

  31. Perhaps the typical picky eater is not as picky as you might have thought. Write down all the foods that your child eats; closely related ones, like string cheese and American cheese. Count things like this separately. Disordered or extreme picky eaters accept only 20 or fewer foods and are usually sensitive to texture, temperature, or colors. If your child really only eats 20 or fewer foods, ask your doctor to refer you to a local dietitian or feeding program. Check out our previous post on Small Portions. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.