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CHILDRENSBOOKS2U BLOG Center In Crown Point Indiana
ChildrensBooks2U Blog

ChildrensBooks2U Blog

  1. When you give your child a new task, it is best to show them how it is done rather than simply telling them what to do. It is not enough to just say, "Get your backpack ready for school every night and put it by the front door." You need to demonstrate to them exactly what you want them to do, because kids this age still have trouble putting events in order. For example, you might say, "Watch how I put the homework in your folder and then put all the books and folder back into the backpack. Then I zip it up and take it to the front door." That is what worked with my sons, David, 7, and Joe, 9. I explain to them step by step what tasks I want them to do, whether it is washing the dishes or folding their laundry. I have found that giving them precise, simple instructions works the best. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child. If you would like to see one of our previous posts on Creating a To Do List, follow the link.



  2. Some parents may unwittingly hold their kids back just out of habit. If you have always flossed your child's teeth, it might not even occur to you to let them try to do it for themselves. Or even perhaps you have been making your child's bed for so long that it has become second nature. To get some perspective, write down the tasks that you do for your child and star a couple that you would feel comfortable handing off. Now 8, Joe has started learning how to wash his clothes and he makes his own snacks after school. Instead of saying, "I am hungry Mom," he makes a peanut-butter sandwich or drizzles some honey on some apple slices. Sometimes he even asks me if I would want anything. Check out our first post on being self-sufficient. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  3. With a little encouragement, your child can handle more responsibility.

    Although my son Joseph was 7, I was still laying out his pajamas for him at bedtime, getting him a drink, and hanging a towel on the shower door so he did not have to grab one from the closet. I found myself making excuses that Joe was tired from school and all his activities, so we would do things for him. There was one day when I was behind on laundry and asked Joe for some help. He very proudly folded three loads better that I did. I had realized that if Joe was doing this task so well, he had the capability of handling others as well. You will be pretty surprised how easy it is to help your own kid become more indepentent. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  4. Most anxious children have a combination of the following conditions.
    • Generalized anxiety disorder: An excessive worry about things that are out of a child's control and a tendency to always imagine the worst case scenario or worry about adult issues, like money.
    • Social anxiety: A child's fear of meeting or talking to people, along with a worry that they will be teased or humiliated and that everyone is judging their every move.
    • Selective mutism: A condition where a child who talks easily with family and friends gets anxious in front of teachers, other authority figures, and even peers that he freezes up and can't speak at all.
    • Separation anxiety: A constant, debilitating fear of being separated from one's parents or that harm will come to them, at a level that is inappropriate for a child's age.
    • Obsessive-compulsive disorder: A need for ritual or compulsive behavior, like washing or counting, to relieve anxiety about a fear or intrusive thoughts about upsetting topics.
    • Phobia: An illogical, all-consuming fear (such as fear of dogs, vomit, elevators, or bugs).
    Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  5. Bedtime help at home
    At their bedtime, create a soothing ritual. Instead of allowing video games or other types of screens, have your child read a book that will calm them or do some relaxing exercises. Some basic yoga is great for relaxing the body. You can also try this exercise called The Four Doors. Before your child goes to bed, have them imagine four doors. Behind each door is something fun, like a party, a favorite cartoon character, a family vacation, or even a chocolate factory. Your child can choose whichever of the four doors to enter and think about what is inside, which can help them feel more in charge of their own bedtime routine. You need to also consider how your own anxiety might be affecting your child. Screaming at the sight of a bug in your room, for instance, will teach them to be afraid of bugs too. So if you have been waiting for a good reason to seek some help for your own anxious behavior, this may be a perfect time. Whether your child gets help for their anxiety through therapy, medication, or by using strategies at home, the change in their behavior can be remarkable. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  6. Helping your child out at home
    If your child does seem a bit anxious but it is not interfering with their normal everyday life, there are plenty of ways you can help them manage their worries without professional assistance. First, ask yourself how much you have accommodated their fears. All parents instinctively want to protect and comfort their children. If your child screams hysterically whenever a dog walks by, you would naturally try to keep them away from dogs. Doing that may make things a bit easier in the short term, but it reinforces their fears. Instead, they need to confront their fears and work on their skills of managing it. You can help your child take small steps, like watching dogs from a distance and then petting a puppy on a leash. With each little victory, celebrate your child's bravery. For some children, a small reward, like fifteen extra minutes on the Xbox, might help them face their fear. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  7. Trying out some drug therapy
    Medication can often be recommended when a child is not making any progress with talk therapy by itself or is so severely impaired that they are not eating or sleeping. This makes many parents very uncomfortable, but doctors will urge them to look at the big picture. If a child has symptoms that will overwhelm their capacity to cope and their parents' ability to help them, then it is appropriate to at least consider every option that is available. In fact, certain medications can often be an essential part of a child's treatment.
    For children that have severe anxiety, there are two types of medication that have been found to be more effective than others. The most common are antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's), such as Prozac and Zoloft. These medications increase the levels of serotonin, which is a naturally occurring chemical in the brain that is known to regulate moods. The second group of medications is antianxiety drugs called benzodiazepines. They are used less frequently because they can cause some hyperactivity in young children and can become less effective over a period of time. Some of the common side effects for all of these medications include headaches, nausea, irritability or sedation. Most of these effects will go away within a couple of weeks, or the prescription or dosage can be adjusted. Talk more with your doctor if you see that your child's behavior or personality seems to be drastically and negatively different after starting the medication. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  8. Most anxious kids are quiet and well-behaved, so their problems can go unnoticed.
    If you are worried about
     your kid's anxiety, it is better to seek out services early rather than to wait it out. Ask your pediatrician or even a school counselor for a referral to a child psychologist or a local clinic, and schedule an evaluation. It is important to treat this meeting with the same matter-of-fact attitude as you would when taking your child to the doctor for a cough. Explain the visit to your child using the same words he uses to tell you about his problems. "We are going to talk to someone who can teach you how not to worry at school." For several kids, especially those in the early stages of an anxiety disorder, cognitive behavioral therapy alone can make them start to feel better within just a few weeks or months. While it will not eliminate anxiety from their life, children learn to recognize what they are feeling and manage those reactions. A child who has an obsessive fear of germs may be taught to notice when his heart beats faster at the sight of someone coughing and to take deep breaths to calm them down. They will also learn coping techniques, such as telling himself, "Millions of people touch things every day and do not get sick." Finally, he will be exposed little by little to his fear, going with the therapist to a public bathroom and touching the sink and then the toilet handle. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

  9. Look On The Bright Side
    Luckily, anxiety is one of the most treatable disorders in kids. With the use of talk therapy and medications, it is found that four-fifths of children can control their anxiety and live a very happy and productive life. However, anxious children often go undiagnosed. Many parents think that their child will simply grow out of this issue or that it is just normal for a child to be nervous. Though some kids with anxiety act out or even refuse to attend school, most children - like my daughter - are quiet and well-behaved. So it is quite easy for them to get lost in the shuffle. When I had first told friends that I was worried about her silence in school, they would say, "She is just shy." And seeing how often parents are accused of helicopter parenting, I did not want to overreact. I am glad that I did not listen to the doubters and instead followed what my gut was telling me. It is unlikely that a child will outgrow an anxiety disorder. When it is left untreated, they will have a higher risk of substance abuse later in life. Did you see our previous post on Anxiety? Check it out here. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  10. Family Connection
    There is a family connection too: Kids with an anxious parent are up to seven times more likely to have an anxiety disorder compared with kids whose parents are not anxious. The link is both biological and behavioral. There is an inherited risk, but when parents are overprotective or model their own fears, they increase their child's risk of anxiety. Difficult situations, like the death of a close relative, moving, or even the ongoing daily stress of having an unemployed parent or tough financial times can also push manageable anxiety into a full-blown disorder. A major event can at times make a child feel like everything in their life is changing and nothing is predictable.
    If your child's worries are keeping them from going to school, playing with friends, or even taking part in other fun activities that they would normally enjoy, or if they complain of headaches or stomachaches that do not have any medical origin, then they probably have a condition that will require treatment.
    Another cause for concern: questions and fears that seem out of proportion to the situation and continue for 6 months or get much worse over time. For instance, it is perfectly normal for a child to ask, "Can that happen to us?" after seeing a news report about a house fire; it is not normal to obsess about that fire several months later. Check out this post on Fears to get more information. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  11. Making Some Sense Out Of Their Fears

    My daughter has suffered from anxiety since she was in kindergarten. Although she talked seemingly nonstop at home, at school she would become so froze with fear that she did not say a single word during the first half of the year. She would constantly as us about tornadoes and floods, though neither was likely to happen where we live. She has the same DNA as her older brother and was raised in the same home, so why was one of my kids confident and calm while the other was wracked with worries?
    It is just the luck of the genetic draw. There is a sort of smoke detector in your head that is supposed to go off when the brain perceives danger, and it triggers the fight-or-flight response. In anxious kids, their smoke detector is set to a much more sensitive level, and they also have a much more dramatic reaction. In fact, it has been shown that the differences in stress response can be detected in babies as young as 6 weeks old, proving that nature is at least as important as nurture when it comes to anxiety.  Here you can check out our first post on Anxiety. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  12. In many cases, kids that have anxiety may stop eating, sleeping, or going to school. At the very least, their instability can set them apart from their peers, often at an age when fitting in is vital. "Jenna is so scared she will do something wrong, like knocking over a toy and making a huge noise, that she avoids playing with others." She has social and separation anxiety plus OCD symptoms brought on by an extreme fear of vomiting. Talking it out has helped her to express her fears, and we have been able to invite kids over so that she can practice socializing on her own turf, but it is a constant struggle for her.
    A child's anxiety can have a ripple effect on the entire family. We pick our vacations based on which location we hope will have the least noise, and we are both exhausted by the end of the day. Since not all kinds of therapy are not covered by insurance, dealing with an anxious kid can also add to a financial burden to an already stressed family. It can be difficult for a marriage too. IF the child tends to confide in only one parent, the other may be skeptical, wondering, "How can a kid be so anxious when nothing bad has ever happened to her?" That is a question that parents across the country, including myself, ask themselves every day.
    Have you read Part 1 of this post. Check it out! Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.




  13. For some children, minor worries turn into outright fears. But with the correct approach, you can assist your child in feeling reassured.

    In many ways, Joe is like a lot of other 7-year-old boys. He plays baseball and football, knows the names of every Star Wars character, and is obsessed with Minecraft. But after his father tucks him in at night, scary thoughts start to pop into his head and he can't let go of them. He worries so much about everything, like that someone might be outside his window or the house will catch on fire. Sometimes these thoughts keep him up all night. I will let him know that we are safe, and although he knows that it is true, he just can not settle it down in his little mind. Even at times during the day, anything that deviates from the normal schedule for Joe can lead to a huge unraveling. We were just a couple of minutes late for dropping him off at baseball practice, and when we arrived he was so worried that everyone was looking at him that he could not relax and join his teammates. All kids get stressed out at times. They will have some butterflies leading up to the first day of school or worry about being left out if their BFF plays with someone else at recess. Most kids will complain, maybe cry a bit, and then move on. But for the estimated one in five kids in the United States who suffer from anxiety disorders (including separation anxiety, social anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder), it is a major challenge to manage their worries. They ricochet through the child's head, getting more intense over time instead of naturally fading away. No matter how much you answer an anxious child's questions or tell them that things are fine, they can not absorb your reassurances. Check out some of our other great posts on our ChildrensBooks2U Blog Page.  Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  14. From time to time we here at ChildrensBooks2U like to give our readers a chance to share some of their stuff. Are you looking to get more exposure? Or maybe you just have a piece of work you have done that you are really proud of. Whatever the case may be we would like to give you the opportunity to share your work with us and our readers. So just drop what you would like to share in the comments. I can't wait to see all the exciting things that you share. Thank you and have a great day.

  15. Perhaps the typical picky eater is not as picky as you might have thought. Write down all the foods that your child eats; closely related ones, like string cheese and American cheese. Count things like this separately. Disordered or extreme picky eaters accept only 20 or fewer foods and are usually sensitive to texture, temperature, or colors. If your child really only eats 20 or fewer foods, ask your doctor to refer you to a local dietitian or feeding program. Check out our previous post on Small Portions. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

  16. Some of the feeding clinics follow a strategy called food chaining, fading, or graduated exposure, using a food that the child does prefer to get them to try something similar. For example, if your child is obsessed with chicken nuggets, it is likely going to be more difficult to introduce shrimp than another kind of chicken. You might go from chicken nuggets to the same kind of nuggets with less breading on them or a different brand of a chicken nugget or chicken strips to pieces of grilled chicken breasts. Then you can move on to something like chicken and rice or noodles.  If you have a pizza fan, you might progress from pizza to pasta with tomato sauce and cheese, to grilled cheese with some tomato soup, to a cheese quesadilla with salsa. You can select foods based on shape or texture (crispy french fries to sweet potato fries, chicken sticks to fish sticks) or (plain pancakes or waffles to waffles with jelly or peanut butter to PB&J). Do not rush from one food or texture to the next. Give it at least a week or two until the gains seem to be maintained. A few months from now, you will be rewarded with a healthier eater. Chech out our post on Focusing on Flavor.  Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

  17. Not all picky eaters want bland food. Some are seeking flavor and/or some crunch. A parent has spoken out and said that her son licked her Buffalo chicken wing and he loved it. If your child prefers sweetness, glazed carrots with a little honey or maple syrup, or if he likes spices, season crab cakes or chicken with chili powder. Let them indulge in the things that they like and you will see that they will become more comfortable in trying new foods. Check out our other post on Sensory Issues. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

  18. If your child is OK with trying foods but never seems to like any of them even after multiple attempts, they may experience flavors or textures more acutely. These few suggestions work especially well for children with sensory problems although all picky eaters may benefit from trying them.

    Slow And Steady. You may think it is ridiculous to puree foods for your 4-year-old. But that is exactly what they sometimes do at the feeding clinics. Try reducing the texture to a smooth consistency, which makes it easier for the child to consume a new flavor. As the sessions go by, make the puree a bit chunkier and chunkier until a couple of months later, they are able to eat the actual foods. The color preferences work in the same manner. Mixing mashed sweet potatoes and mashed white potatoes together, and the kids can barely tell the difference. But as the weeks go by the color begins to change. When it begins to look orange, they usually do not freak out because the progress has been so gradual. If your child does not like potatoes, you can try this at home with other foods, like plain yogurt (stir in a small amount of fruit sauce or jam) or pancakes (add puree fruit or veggies to the batter).
    Check out our post on recording your progress. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.


  19. At some of the feeding clinics, the staff will take pictures or video of the accomplishments for parents to show their child at home as a reminder that they liked a new food. Parents are encouraged to casually say something like, "Oh, look at the day you tried some baby carrots at the clinic and thought that they were OK." We are having carrots and dip for a snack today. Check out our post on keep your cool. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.always praise your child.

  20. Some kids that avoid food relish the attention that it brings them. There was this instance when a kid said that he wanted to try a bagel. So the husband went out to fetch a pack of bagels. The mom played with the kid the whole time the father was gone. But when dad got back with one of every flavor bagel they sold, their son was not interested in eating any of them and needed a lot of coaxing.
    The message: Do not necessarily make a huge deal when your child wants to try something new. The more casual you are about it (offer him a piece, but do not watch him eat it), the more likely it is that he will actually follow through. Check out our post on an adventurous friend. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

  21. While the sessions at the clinic usually take place one-on-one, at home you can harness the power of peers. You and your spouse hold the power as to what your child tries, but no one can make a bigger difference than their friends. Preschoolers are more likely to taste something like a mango if they see one of their classmates try it first. Sometimes all it takes is for a friend to snatch a piece of broccoli for your kid to want to nibble on it. Of course, one taste probably will not make him a big fan of broccoli, but it will help him get over the hump of trying it, which is half the battle right there. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.
  22. Before the actual appointment, most feeding clinics ask parents to record what their child has eaten and drunk for at least the last 3 days. When they look at the records, they see a lot of kids who resist new foods, eat snack foods or drink all day long, which limits their hunger for foods at meals. Once families cut back to three meals and one to three snacks at consistent times, they find that their kids are more receptive to trying something new because they are truly hungry. The same goes for drinks. Check out our post on sticking with it. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.



  23. You have probably heard the saying before that kids have to try something 10-15 times before they like it. While it does sound daunting to many parents who have a hard time getting their kids to try something once, it does become easier. Once you get the ball rolling on tasting new foods, it takes an average of only 6 attempts for kids to accept them. Still, a lot of parents do not want to introduce new foods at lunch or dinner because it may ruin the meal for the whole family. Instead, offer them at snack time. Check out our post on starting with new foods. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

  24.    Of course, you are not giving your child a huge bowl of peas. But many parents offer a portion that is way too large. You should usually begin with pieces so small that they could literally be blown away. At home, try a single pea, part of a noodle, or a crumble of cheese. Encourage your child by saying something like, "This is easy, you could be done in a second." Once your child eats it, give him a food he does like. Then, at subsequent meals, increase the portion of the new food and phase out the follow-up food. This strategy really works. A child who would only eat pretzels, potato chips, applesauce, and a handful of other foods before he began his rehab. He had a sliver of an apple and immediately afterward he got a few pretzels. Every day the amount of apple was increased and the amount of pretzels was decreased. In about 6 weeks he had tried 13 new fruits and vegetables and even found a few that he liked a lot. Now he asks for strawberries and blueberries. There is light at the end of the tunnel. See our first post on picky eaters. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.

  25. Many frustrated parents are sending their fussy children to specially designed clinics at the children's hospitals. What strategies do the experts there have to improve your kid's diet? Get the scoop here.

       Up until about 2 years ago, 8-year-old David's diet consisted of mostly milk, applesauce, crustless PB&J, and crackers. His pediatrician kept telling me not to worry because he was otherwise a healthy kid. Even his weight and height were fine. The doctor said he would grow out of being a picky eater. But that did not happen. By the time he had turned 7, his pickiness had escalated to the point where he started gagging when he tried any new foods. Even if it was a bite of a chocolate chip cookie or a bite of mac 'n' cheese. Birthday parties and family get-togethers were nerve racking. He would not eat pizza or even the treats at his friends' parties. When we would go for ice cream as a family, he would just ask for a cup of sprinkles.
       With his eating habits only getting worse, there must be other options and running across an outpatient program at a local hospital had to be the answer. It was there that the experts said, "We see a wide range of kids. From those who do not like a vegetable to other kids who have never eaten solid food at all." Some have autism, digestive problems, or food allergies. But other kids are like David. They are the ones without any underlying medical condition whose fussy eating habits are getting in the way of family life.

    Tasting Tricks
       David would have to leave the table and go into another room to put a new food in his mouth. He would get anxious and the whole process would take up almost the entire dinnertime. Some of the foods that he enjoys now in kid-sized portions include meatballs, chicken, and cheesy nachos. We can give him a decent dinner instead of crackers and a cup of applesauce. See what helps kids who are reluctant to try new foods. Leave us your comments. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. Let us know what other topics you would like to have discussed. Share this post with your family and friends. Remember to always praise your child.